Telecommunication Networks

Telecommunication Networks
A Telecommunications network is a network of nodes, links, trunks and telephone switches that are connected, operated by telephone companies and realize telephone, audio, visual and data communications among the users. The telecommunications network can also include Internet, microwave, and wireless equipment. The nodes are connected by transmission links and use the circuit switching, message switching or packet switching to pass the signal to the terminals that have the unique addresses. The set of network addresses is called the address space.
Telecommunications network, electronic system of links and switches, and the controls that govern their operation, that allows for data transfer and exchange among multiple users.
When several users of telecommunications media wish to communicate with one another, they must be organized into some form of network. In theory, each user can be given a direct point-to-point link to all the other users in what is known as a fully connected topology (similar to the connections employed in the earliest days of telephony), but in practice this technique is impractical and expensive—especially for a large and dispersed network. Furthermore, the method is inefficient, since most of the links will be idle at any given time. Modern telecommunications networks avoid these issues by establishing a linked network of switches, or nodes, such that each user is connected to one of the nodes. Each link in such a network is called a communications channel. Wire, fiber-optic cable, and radio waves may be used for different communications channels.
The examples of the telecommunications networks are: telephone networks, Internet, computer networks, wide area networks (WAN), local area networks (LAN), virtual private networks (VPN), PTSA, aeronautical ACARS network, global Telex network, etc.